IN ORDER TO GIVE OURSELVES AT LEAST TEN DAYS BETWEEN DELIVERIES, ON ALTERNATING MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS. I’ve posted calendars showing each month’s delivery dates in both the “UPDATES” blog and the “TIPS AND FACTS” page in the menu!

PASTURE RAISED DUCK EGGS
PASTURE RAISED DUCK EGGS
PASTURE RAISED DUCK EGGS
PASTURE RAISED DUCK EGGS

PASTURE RAISED DUCK EGGS

Regular price $0.00 $7.00 Sale

NOTICE:  WE CANNOT SHIP EGGS THROUGH THE MAIL!

(Use the drop-down menu to choose either full or half dozen cartons!)  

Farm fresh, pastured, duck eggs from ducks who are fed soy-free, NON-GMO feed along with produce we've grown, healthy tidbits from the kitchen, and whatever plants and insects they forage for on their own.  Duck eggs are much larger than chicken eggs, each one weighing around 2.35-3.8 ounces!

If you haven't tried duck eggs, you need to!  The whites have more protein than chicken egg whites, which makes for extra fluffy baked goods.  And duck eggs have a higher yolk-to-white ration, which gives them an overall higher nutritional value.  They're also safe for people who are allergic to chicken eggs!  We use them in just about anything we bake (from pancakes and waffles, to cakes and breads).  And we also love using them in a 50/50 ration with chicken eggs whenever we do scrambled eggs, because the duck eggs noticeably improve the texture.

ABOUT OUR DUCKS:  We love our silly ducks, and just like with our chickens we wanted to make sure they have the freedom to engage in all the natural behaviors that bring them joy.  So along with a large yard to play in, we built them a deluxe pond that's wide enough for real swimming and deep enough for diving.  From early morning until after dark, they get to swim in their private pond, root around in the mud puddles we routinely create, graze on grass & weeds, and chase after various insects!  Then they're herded into a safe and cozy coop for the night, where they leave us delicious eggs in the wee hours of the morning. 

NOTE:  Despite having been washed, duck egg shells will often have a fishy scent to them, and both when you first crack one open and first whisk the contents, you’ll often pick up on it.  HOWEVER, the “off” smell should disappear within a few seconds.  (They’ll continue to smell different from chicken eggs, but should no longer have any strong “fishiness”.)  If you continue to pick up on an unpleasant "fishiness", first walk well away from the shell to make sure you aren't just smelling that.  If that doesn’t fix the issue, feel free to toss that one (or, better yet, serve it up to your pets).  Contact us and we'll either give you a credit or send you a replacement egg with the next order.  Honestly, we don't know if that smell would translate into a fishy taste once cooked, but we're not interested in finding out and we wouldn't ask you to!  (This has only happened to us a handful of times out of hundreds of eggs we've eaten, and usually it involved an egg that had been cracked.  So hopefully it won't ever be an issue for you!) 

DUCK EGG CRACKING TUTORIAL:  Duck eggs can be intimidating to open at first, but with a little practice you'll be a pro in no time.  The key is to understand that both the inner and outer shell of a duck egg is significantly thicker than those of a chicken egg, so they require a much heavier hand to open.  I always crack them individually into a clear bowl, because these shells are slightly more likely to crumble and clear glass makes it easier to double check and fish out any shell "crumbs".  You can either take a large, very sharp knife and firmly whack the egg to crack into the shell, or simply crack it using the side of a bowl.  For the latter, you'll want to place one hand on the bowl to hold it steady, then take the egg in your other hand and give it a very firm whack against the edge of the bowl.  Don't be timid about it.  The same amount of force that would absolutely shatter an entire chicken egg will simply result in a neat little opening in one side of your duck egg!  (***See below if you find you didn't whack it hard enough to rupture the inner membrane.)  After I've cracked the egg (assuming I didn't accidentally hit it with so much force that there's now a very wide gap in the shell), I usually hold it upright under running water for a moment to rinse off the tiny "shell crumbs".  (I've found it's easier to part with the small amount of egg white that washes away than to go fishing for the "shell crumbs" that may have gotten trapped in it!)   I also quickly rinse off the bowl I'm using, because shell "dust" frequently sticks to the rim and/or falls into the bowl when the egg is whacked.  Then I gently pry open the two sides of the crack, to create an opening wide enough for the very large yolk to slide out, then empty it into the bowl and scan one last time for shell bits.

***If you didn't whack it quite hard enough, and you probably won't at first, you'll discover that the outer shell cracked a bit but the inner shell membrane is still very much in-tact.  (It feels like rubber, almost like a balloon.)  DO NOT whack your egg a second time, because you'll end up knocking all those broken bits of shell right into your bowl.  Instead, run it under water for a second to wash off crumbles (I'd rinse off the bowl, as well, because it probably got shell dust in it or along it's rim), then use your fingernail to gingerly lift away larger bits of cracked outer shell piece by piece preferably without tearing the inner membraneTry to expose as much of the inner membrane as you can, ideally at least an area that's larger than a quarter.  Next, run it under water again to wash off small bits, then take a knife & slice an "x" into the inner membrane.  Because of the massive yolks, it will take a little work to coax the contents out of the hole you've created, and you may need to tear the inner membrane out of the way, or even use the knife to break the yolk inside so it can slide out more easily. 

NOTICE:  WE CANNOT SHIP EGGS THROUGH THE MAIL!

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